Over the past 10 years – and compared to every other state in the United States – Delaware has been extraordinary. Under former Governor Markell and continuing with Governor Carney, state government has made significant investments in infrastructure for people cycling and walking. No city in Delaware has benefited more from these investments than New…
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Over the past 10 years – and compared to every other state in the United States – Delaware has been extraordinary. Under former Governor Markell and continuing with Governor Carney, state government has made significant investments in infrastructure for people cycling and walking.

No city in Delaware has benefited more from these investments than New Castle, where the Wilmington-New Castle Greenway (aka the “Markell Trail”) – a safe, direct, paved, flat and nearly uninterrupted non-motorized seven-mile travel route between the Wilmington Riverfront and downtown New Castle – opened last September.

Even in New Castle, however, not everyone knows how to access the city's amazing new trail, which underlined the serious need for appropriate “wayfinding” signage. In July of 2015 (long before the trail opened!) Bike Delaware began working with DelDOT to secure the needed regulatory approval. It wasn't easy. Believe it or not, transportation signs are highly regulated by the U.S. Government in Washington DC. And New Castle's color-unique signs to help cyclists get where they want to go are the first of their kind (i.e. at the state level) anywhere in the United States.

Check out this short slideshow of New Castle's colorful, and useful, new signs for cyclists:

The first color-unique wayfinding signs for cyclists in Delaware are on the ground in New Castle. (Photo credit: Erik Ball/DelDOT.) The signs use white text on a maroon background - a color used by no other traffic signs in Delaware. (Photo credit: Erik Ball/DelDOT.) Getting these signs turned into a multi-year effort because traffic signs - especially the *color* of traffic signs - are highly regulated in Washington DC. (Photo credit: Erik Ball/DelDOT.) Here is a sign at Boulden Boulevard - a high speed road near New Castle - where it intersects the Markell Trail. One of the most important functions of Delaware's new signs is to alert cyclists to opportunities to get where they want to go via "low stress" routes. At this intersection, a cyclist can get off of Boulden and turn onto the Markell Trail to get to either downtown New Castle or to Wilmington. (Photo credit: Erik Ball/DelDOT.) In some locations, signage is a mixture of the new ("low stress" on maroon background) with conventional signs (on green background) because the available bike routes are not all low stress. These "mixed" signs are now a daily reminder in New Castle of the remaining need to make changes in local bicycle infrastructure so that there are low stress routes for cyclists to all destinations. (Photo credit: Erik Ball/DelDOT.)