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Hockessin Community News
  • Ten years later CIAA still stays intact

  • Ten years later, the Delaware Clean Indoor Air Act (CIAA) still remains untouched and respected by health-conscious Delawareans and visitors.
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  • Ten years later, the Delaware Clean Indoor Air Act (CIAA) still remains untouched and respected by health-conscious Delawareans and visitors.
    Delaware was the second state, after California, to pass a law against smoking in indoor workplaces and public places. Senator David McBride and Senator Patricia Blevins, along with Representative Deborah Hudson and many others, sponsored Senate Bill 99, which amended Title 16 of the Delaware Code relating to the Clean Indoor Air Act. Former Governor Ruth Ann Minner signed SB 99 on May 31, 2002, and it became effective six months later. The law banned indoor smoking at workplaces, healthcare facilities, public and non-public schools, restaurants, bars, libraries, museums, theaters, auditoriums, casinos, and 75 percent of hotel rooms.
    Smoking costs the state of Delaware more than $1 billion annually, according to the 2011 Plan for a Tobacco-free Delaware issued by the IMPACT Delaware Tobacco Prevention Coalition. The CIAA law is credited with helping smoking levels among Delaware's youth fall to all-time lows, according to the Department of Education's Youth Risk Behavior Survey.
    Complaints about indoor smoking violations should be placed to DPH at (800) 297-5926. If a smoking violation is found, DPH assesses an administrative penalty ranging from $100 to $1,000, depending on the frequency of violations.
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