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Hockessin Community News
  • Exhibit and fundraiser debut at Yorklyn Museum

  • Last weekend, the Smithsonian Museum on Main Street exhibit The Way We Worked debuted, in conjunction with the Museum's inaugural fundraiser event, the Auburn Heights Invitational Historic Automobile Display.
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  • The Marshall Steam Museum is well-known for its collection of antique Stanley Steamers and family-friendly train rides. Last weekend, the Smithsonian Museum on Main Street exhibit The Way We Worked debuted, in conjunction with the Museum's inaugural fundraiser event, the Auburn Heights Invitational Historic Automobile Display.
    Both events celebrated the Museum's rich history and beautiful collection of Stanley Steamers.
    Tom Marshall, who is responsible for the collection of Steamers at the Marshall Museum, learned the industry from his father, Clarence. He began collecting steam cars when he bought back a 1913 model 76 Stanley that he had originally sold as a dealer.   
    STEAMIN’ DAY SUNDAY
    Don’t miss Steamin’ Day this Sunday, Oct. 7 from 12:30-4:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.auburnheights.org.
     
     
    Susan Randolph, Executive Director of Marshall Steam Museum and Friends of Auburn Heights Preserve, said the Invitational is similar to many other high-end car shows in that it will emphasize style and progression.
    The Way We Worked, adapted from an original exhibition developed by the National Archives and Records Administration, explores how work has become a central element in American culture. It traces the many changes that have affected the workforce and work environments over the past 150 years, including the growth of manufacturing and increasing use of technology. The exhibition draws from the Archives' rich collections, including historical photographs, archival accounts of workers, film, audio and interactives, to tell the compelling story of how work impacts our lives and the historical and cultural fabric of our communities.
    The Way We Worked is housed within the Marshall Steam Museum, where visitors can look over impressive assortment of Stanley Steamers from Tom Marshall's collection, all of which are road registered except for one, Randolph said. And despite the engines not being built with the horsepower that we are now accustomed, they still can reach a steady 75 mph.
    The Marshall Steam Museum at Auburn Heights Preserve is proud to serve as the debut Delaware site for the exhibit, which is made possible by the Delaware Humanities Forum. The exhibit will remain on view at the museum through Nov. 24.
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