Steve Terranova is a modern day superhero. The mild mannered urologist performs surgery by day, then slips into the phone booth, grabs his guitar, and rocks out with his cover band, Blue Light Special, at night.


Steve Terranova is a modern day superhero. The mild mannered urologist performs surgery by day, then slips into the phone booth, grabs his guitar, and rocks out with his cover band, Blue Light Special, at night.

Named after K-Mart’s familiar marketing strategy, the cover band will perform at Six Paupers Tavern & Restaurant on Saturday, July 1 at 9.m. There’s no cover charge.

Along with Terranova, who plays guitar, the band is comprised of Rose Harris Veinot (singer), Scott Veinot (guitar), Ryan Wuebbles (bass) and Tony Casale (drummer).
Founded nearly a year ago, Blue Light Special offers a mixed bag of classic rock songs from the ‘70s and ‘80s era. At any given show you might hear anything from Jimi Hendrix to ZZ Top.

“We’re having fun when we play, so you have to have fun if you’re there with us,” said Terranova of Hockessin. “When we play, we just enjoy it so much. It’s almost impossible not to enjoy one of our shows.”

Terranova, 40, who’s employed with Brandywine Urology Consultants, recognizes that some people might think playing music and being a doctor are on opposite ends of the spectrum. But he disagrees.

IF YOU GO

WHAT Blue Light Special concert

WHEN 9 p.m. Friday, July 1

WHERE Six Paupers, 7465 Lancaster Pike, Hockessin

COST Free

INFO www.openroadtunes.com

“You’re a scientist,” Terranova said. “But you’re also an artist as a surgeon.”

In the operating room, when he’s performing surgery, he comes across different body styles and different anatomy, he said. “You have to adapt, and that’s the art part.”

In addition to rocking with the Blue Light Special, the surgeon plays with the Open Road.

Open Road offers a rock, country and blues sound, and Terranova writes original songs for the group. The band recently released their first album titled “Stars Shine in the Night.” The album covers topics that everyone can relate to, such as relationships and the desire to be independent.

While he enjoys caring for his patients, and has no desire to stop being a urologist, Terranova knows that creating music gives him the opportunity to positively impact a wider range of people.

“I became a doctor because I wanted to help people, and I’m hoping to be able to do the same with my music,” he said. “If you listen to a lot of music these days it’s negative. I don’t want that for my people. I want my people to hear [my music] and say, ‘you know what? I want to go out and have a good day.’”