Comic strip illustrator Claire Folkman draws inspiration from romance novels and comic books in her film entitled “Young Love: A Romance in Three Acts.”


Comic strip illustrator Claire Folkman draws inspiration from romance novels and comic books in her film entitled “Young Love: A Romance in Three Acts.”

The film will air at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts until July 7.

“Young Love” is a three-minute silent film that reinvents the cliché romance story of “boy meets girl, boy loses girl and boy gets girl back.” The film follows three couples who represent the three aforementioned phases of a romance story. Although the ending of the film won’t come as a surprise to romance buffs, the production of the movie will – since it’s narrated with live comic strip “thought bubbles.”

“There’s something about silence that causes people to pay more attention,” said Folkman of Philadelphia, Pa. “It’s so easy to lose someone’s attention. You have maybe four seconds to grab someone before they blink and turn away.”

Another unique aspect of “Young Love” is that the actors aren’t actors – they’re real couples who are also Folkman’s friends. Folkman believes casting amateurs in the film helps to paint the picture of how people would behave in a fantasy setting, “instead of how they’re expected to behave.”

IF YOU GO

WHAT Young Love: A Romance in Three Acts

WHEN Runs through July 7

WHERE Delaware Center of the Contemporary Arts, 200 South Madison St., Wilmington

COST Free

INFO www.thedcca.org

She added, “My actors aren’t actors - they don’t move [correctly]. They move in an awkward way because they’re being told how to move. You can see how self-conscious they are about it.”

Folkman isn’t bashing her friends – she’s just being honest about “Young Love.” In fact, she’s fascinated with writing and reading autobiographical comic books like Craig Thompson’s “Blankets” or Erika Moen’s “Dar!,” because she enjoys “looking into someone else’s life and [seeing their] struggles,” Folkman said. Peering into other people’s lives has been helpful to her since “it’s confirmation that I’m just as normal as they are.”

As for why she enjoys reading romance novels like Loretta Chase’s “Lord of Scoundrels,” Folkman said it’s refreshing to know that everything can go “horribly wrong,” but in the end of each story you know the protagonist “will get the girl.”