Hockessin's Margaretta Frederick was recently named chief curator at the Delaware Art Museum. The Community News caught up with Frederick to learn more about her expanded role at the museum.


Hockessin's Margaretta Frederick was recently named chief curator at the Delaware Art Museum. The Community News caught up with Frederick to learn more about her expanded role at the museum.

Q) What are you looking forward to the most in your new role as chief curator?

A) I am looking forward to raising the profile of the curatorial department within the community by making our constituents aware of the level of expertise represented within the Museum’s Curatorial Department and sharing our knowledge of our collections with our many visitors.

Q) How did you first develop an interest in art?

A) When I was quite young, my father would take me to art museums regularly. When I was about 12, I can remember being particularly enthusiastic upon seeing works by the Impressionist Claude Monet at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C.

Q) What is involved in being an art curator?

A) The Delaware Art Museum’s curators care for a 12,000-object collection, preserving it for the enjoyment of future generations. They design and install exhibitions of art and interpret the art to delight and engage present day viewers.

Q) What are some of the challenges of being curator for an exhibit?

A) The current economic climate is certainly the biggest challenge for any non-profit organization; however, the Delaware Art Museum has been lucky to recently receive several generously donated collections. We also are lucky because we have thousands of incredible works of art to share in our permanent collections.

Putting together an exhibition is also a challenge because it’s very time-consuming and detail-oriented. But witnessing an exhibition’s completion always makes any effort or challenge worth it!

Q) The museum has a very large collection of Pre-Raphaelite artworks. What do you think makes the work of the Pre-Raphaelites so notable?

A) The work of the Pre-Raphaelite artists visually captures the time and place in which they lived, allowing present day viewers a unique view into history. This specific collection also reflects the passion of Samuel Bancroft, a local businessman whose unusual passion for this group of artists is an important part of our community history.

Q) What do you think makes the Delaware Art Museum unique?

A) The diverse collections of the Delaware Art Museum reflect the unique characteristics of the community in which we live. Where else in the world can you find comprehensive collections of Pre-Raphaelite art, American illustration and the work of John Sloan and The Eight?